reblogged The Penguin Press
Source: The Atlantic
reblogged teachingliteracy:

brayndrayn

Do you remember the old days when doing research meant knowing the alphabet and the Dewey Decimal system?

reblogged teachingliteracy:

brayndrayn

Do you remember the old days when doing research meant knowing the alphabet and the Dewey Decimal system?

reblogged Kelsey Camille

reblogged Kelsey Camille

reblogged raptorific who wrote:

I have too much time on my hands. 

reblogged doonlibrary:

Love it!
Every home should have one!
Available from Walker Books

Cute!

reblogged doonlibrary:

Love it!

Every home should have one!

Available from Walker Books

Cute!

reblogged mangabottle
Great advice.

reblogged mangabottle

Great advice.

reblogged literatureslut:

Orange Prize shortlist is announced! And here are the six books that made it to the list…
Half Blood Blues - Esi Edugyan
The Forgotten - Anne Enright
Painter of Silence - Georgina Harding
The Song of Achilles - Madeline Miller
Foreign Bodies - Cynthia Ozick
State of Wonder - Anne Patchett

source: http://www.orangeprize.co.uk/

reblogged literatureslut:

Orange Prize shortlist is announced! And here are the six books that made it to the list…

Half Blood Blues - Esi Edugyan

The Forgotten - Anne Enright

Painter of Silence - Georgina Harding

The Song of Achilles - Madeline Miller

Foreign Bodies - Cynthia Ozick

State of Wonder - Anne Patchett

source: http://www.orangeprize.co.uk/

reblogged curmudgeonlaine
powells:

ecantwell:

OUCH.
(Today’s epigraph: “No award.”) 

You can check out the winners in poetry, biography, history, and nonfiction here.

Just.

reblogged curmudgeonlaine

powells:

ecantwell:

OUCH.

(Today’s epigraph: “No award.”) 

You can check out the winners in poetry, biography, history, and nonfiction here.

Just.

As a writer, you should not judge, you should understand.

- Ernest Hemingway (reblogged artisticfreefall)

Judgement free zone!

Hey doodler, what's your favorite kind of book to read?

*Disclaimer: all Turkish phrases below are via google translate, I apologize if they are wrong *

Merhaba Timas Publishing! My favourite (Canadian sp.) kind of book to read is literary fiction.  I also read other genres (YA, Sci Fi, Non Fic, memoirs, graphic novels, humour, plays, poetry, philosophy) to try and stay a well rounded reader and hopefully a more open-minded aspiring writer. The one type of book that I have not made enough of an effort to read is definitely fantasy. Right now on my “to read” list there are only two fantasy titles “The Princess Bride" and "The Neverending Story" You can also check out my #books tag to see which books I have been posting about.

Thanks for following! Have a great day C:

Sorduğun için teşekkürler Doodler!

reblogged doubledaybooks:

FSF never lies.

… or so he would have you believe :P

reblogged doubledaybooks:

FSF never lies.

… or so he would have you believe :P

reblogged twinfawns:

Jeremy May cuts sheets from books, sticks them together and covers them with lacquer, creating beautiful jewelry. When he’s finished, he places the pieces right back where they came from.

Wow.

Author // Chris Ward

http://bookmachine.org

…and now, God help us, he’s writing a novel: a form unrestrained by such quibbling concerns as budget or filmability. If the above is the kind of thing he was able to get released to your local multiplex, with all the compromises inherent in a medium as collaborative as filmmaking, just imagine what he’ll try to pull when he doesn’t have to please anyone but himself. Seriously, try it. You can’t, because you’re not Charlie Kaufman, and Charlie Kaufman is the only person alive with a mind that works like that.

Of course, the fact that Kaufman is turning to literary fiction is enough of a hook in and of itself to sell Grand Central more than a few copies of whatever he turns in. It’s destined for critical adoration, for one thing, and Kaufman’s sure to bring a substantial number of his existing fanbase with him, if only out of curiosity. The really interesting part, though, will be sitting back and watching while Grand Central try to figure out how the hell they’re going to punt it to everyone else.

Whoa. My fave screenwriter is writing a book.

reblogged theatlantic:

A Slow Books Manifesto: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.
Why so much emphasis on what goes into our mouths, and so little on what goes into our minds? What about having fun while exerting greater control over what goes into your brain? Why hasn’t a hip alliance emerged that’s concerned about what happens to our intellectual health, our country, and, yes, our happiness when we consume empty-calorie entertainment? The Slow Food manifesto lauds “quieter pleasures” as a means of opposing “the universal folly of Fast Life”—yet there’s little that seems more foolish, loudly unpleasant, and universal than the screens that blare in every corner of America (at the airport, at the gym, in the elevator, in our hands). “Fast” entertainment, consumed mindlessly as we slump on the couch or do our morning commute, pickles our brains—and our souls.
That’s why I’m calling for a Slow Books Movement (one that’s a little more developed than this perfectly admirable attempt).
In our leisure moments, whenever we have down time, we should turn to literature—to works that took some time to write and will take some time to read, but will also stay with us longer than anything else. They’ll help us unwind better than any electronic device—and they’ll pleasurably sharpen our minds and identities, too.
To borrow a cadence from Michael Pollan: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.
Aim for 30 minutes a day. You can squeeze in that half hour pretty easily if only, during your free moments—whenever you find yourself automatically switching on that boob tube, or firing up your laptop to check your favorite site, or scanning Twitter for something to pass the time—you pick up a meaningful work of literature. […]
If you’re not reading slowly, you’re doing yourself—and your community—a great wrong. As poet Joseph Brodsky said in his 1987 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, “Though we can condemn … the persecution of writers, acts of censorship, the burning of books, we are powerless when it comes to [the worst crime against literature]: that of not reading the books. For that … a person pays with his whole life; … a nation … pays with its history.”
Read more.[Image: Reuters]

Preach!

reblogged theatlantic:

A Slow Books Manifesto: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.

Why so much emphasis on what goes into our mouths, and so little on what goes into our minds? What about having fun while exerting greater control over what goes into your brain? Why hasn’t a hip alliance emerged that’s concerned about what happens to our intellectual health, our country, and, yes, our happiness when we consume empty-calorie entertainment? The Slow Food manifesto lauds “quieter pleasures” as a means of opposing “the universal folly of Fast Life”—yet there’s little that seems more foolish, loudly unpleasant, and universal than the screens that blare in every corner of America (at the airport, at the gym, in the elevator, in our hands). “Fast” entertainment, consumed mindlessly as we slump on the couch or do our morning commute, pickles our brains—and our souls.

That’s why I’m calling for a Slow Books Movement (one that’s a little more developed than this perfectly admirable attempt).

In our leisure moments, whenever we have down time, we should turn to literature—to works that took some time to write and will take some time to read, but will also stay with us longer than anything else. They’ll help us unwind better than any electronic device—and they’ll pleasurably sharpen our minds and identities, too.

To borrow a cadence from Michael Pollan: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.

Aim for 30 minutes a day. You can squeeze in that half hour pretty easily if only, during your free moments—whenever you find yourself automatically switching on that boob tube, or firing up your laptop to check your favorite site, or scanning Twitter for something to pass the time—you pick up a meaningful work of literature. […]

If you’re not reading slowly, you’re doing yourself—and your community—a great wrong. As poet Joseph Brodsky said in his 1987 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, “Though we can condemn … the persecution of writers, acts of censorship, the burning of books, we are powerless when it comes to [the worst crime against literature]: that of not reading the books. For that … a person pays with his whole life; … a nation … pays with its history.”

Read more.[Image: Reuters]

Preach!

Read the book. Saw the movie.

Read the book. Saw the movie.