Author // Chris Ward

http://bookmachine.org

…and now, God help us, he’s writing a novel: a form unrestrained by such quibbling concerns as budget or filmability. If the above is the kind of thing he was able to get released to your local multiplex, with all the compromises inherent in a medium as collaborative as filmmaking, just imagine what he’ll try to pull when he doesn’t have to please anyone but himself. Seriously, try it. You can’t, because you’re not Charlie Kaufman, and Charlie Kaufman is the only person alive with a mind that works like that.

Of course, the fact that Kaufman is turning to literary fiction is enough of a hook in and of itself to sell Grand Central more than a few copies of whatever he turns in. It’s destined for critical adoration, for one thing, and Kaufman’s sure to bring a substantial number of his existing fanbase with him, if only out of curiosity. The really interesting part, though, will be sitting back and watching while Grand Central try to figure out how the hell they’re going to punt it to everyone else.

Whoa. My fave screenwriter is writing a book.

reblogged theatlantic:

A Slow Books Manifesto: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.
Why so much emphasis on what goes into our mouths, and so little on what goes into our minds? What about having fun while exerting greater control over what goes into your brain? Why hasn’t a hip alliance emerged that’s concerned about what happens to our intellectual health, our country, and, yes, our happiness when we consume empty-calorie entertainment? The Slow Food manifesto lauds “quieter pleasures” as a means of opposing “the universal folly of Fast Life”—yet there’s little that seems more foolish, loudly unpleasant, and universal than the screens that blare in every corner of America (at the airport, at the gym, in the elevator, in our hands). “Fast” entertainment, consumed mindlessly as we slump on the couch or do our morning commute, pickles our brains—and our souls.
That’s why I’m calling for a Slow Books Movement (one that’s a little more developed than this perfectly admirable attempt).
In our leisure moments, whenever we have down time, we should turn to literature—to works that took some time to write and will take some time to read, but will also stay with us longer than anything else. They’ll help us unwind better than any electronic device—and they’ll pleasurably sharpen our minds and identities, too.
To borrow a cadence from Michael Pollan: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.
Aim for 30 minutes a day. You can squeeze in that half hour pretty easily if only, during your free moments—whenever you find yourself automatically switching on that boob tube, or firing up your laptop to check your favorite site, or scanning Twitter for something to pass the time—you pick up a meaningful work of literature. […]
If you’re not reading slowly, you’re doing yourself—and your community—a great wrong. As poet Joseph Brodsky said in his 1987 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, “Though we can condemn … the persecution of writers, acts of censorship, the burning of books, we are powerless when it comes to [the worst crime against literature]: that of not reading the books. For that … a person pays with his whole life; … a nation … pays with its history.”
Read more.[Image: Reuters]

Preach!

reblogged theatlantic:

A Slow Books Manifesto: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.

Why so much emphasis on what goes into our mouths, and so little on what goes into our minds? What about having fun while exerting greater control over what goes into your brain? Why hasn’t a hip alliance emerged that’s concerned about what happens to our intellectual health, our country, and, yes, our happiness when we consume empty-calorie entertainment? The Slow Food manifesto lauds “quieter pleasures” as a means of opposing “the universal folly of Fast Life”—yet there’s little that seems more foolish, loudly unpleasant, and universal than the screens that blare in every corner of America (at the airport, at the gym, in the elevator, in our hands). “Fast” entertainment, consumed mindlessly as we slump on the couch or do our morning commute, pickles our brains—and our souls.

That’s why I’m calling for a Slow Books Movement (one that’s a little more developed than this perfectly admirable attempt).

In our leisure moments, whenever we have down time, we should turn to literature—to works that took some time to write and will take some time to read, but will also stay with us longer than anything else. They’ll help us unwind better than any electronic device—and they’ll pleasurably sharpen our minds and identities, too.

To borrow a cadence from Michael Pollan: Read books. As often as you can. Mostly classics.

Aim for 30 minutes a day. You can squeeze in that half hour pretty easily if only, during your free moments—whenever you find yourself automatically switching on that boob tube, or firing up your laptop to check your favorite site, or scanning Twitter for something to pass the time—you pick up a meaningful work of literature. […]

If you’re not reading slowly, you’re doing yourself—and your community—a great wrong. As poet Joseph Brodsky said in his 1987 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, “Though we can condemn … the persecution of writers, acts of censorship, the burning of books, we are powerless when it comes to [the worst crime against literature]: that of not reading the books. For that … a person pays with his whole life; … a nation … pays with its history.”

Read more.[Image: Reuters]

Preach!

Read the book. Saw the movie.

Read the book. Saw the movie.

Interesting Goodreads infographic about dystopian novels and The Hunger Games.
(Click for full size)

Interesting Goodreads infographic about dystopian novels and The Hunger Games.

(Click for full size)

reblogged onthestrand:

A sneak look at the new Penguin Essentials set, fresh in from the printers last night!

Awesome!

reblogged onthestrand:

A sneak look at the new Penguin Essentials set, fresh in from the printers last night!

Awesome!

reblogged panemaniac
#TeamHaymitch ! haha.
Cheers!
OMG watching this tomorrow night!

reblogged panemaniac

#TeamHaymitch ! haha.

Cheers!


OMG watching this tomorrow night!


Emma Brockes
guardian.co.uk
Sunday 2 October 2011
Maurice Sendak interview

"I refuse to lie to children," says Sendak. "I refuse to cater to the bullshit of innocence."

guardian.co.uk

Sunday 2 October 2011

Maurice Sendak interview

"I refuse to lie to children," says Sendak. "I refuse to cater to the bullshit of innocence."

reblogged hardboundbookhound:

Kanye West once infamously said, “I would never want a book’s autograph.” In light of this, we wonder how he feels about Annabelle Quezada and La Shea Delaney’s bookish parody of his and Jay-Z’s song “N*ggas in Paris.”

Dubbed “B*itches in Bookshops,” the girls cover countless book geek references:Goodreads, Friday Reads, Foucault, Proust, Barthes…we could go on and on.

With lines like, “Read so hard librarians tryin’ ta FINE me­ /They can’t identify me/ Checked in with a pseudonym, so I guess you can say I’m Mark Twaining,” we’re hoping that these ladies make a follow up.

Check out the video below, or click here to go the Annabelle’s blog:

From HuffPost

From : http://hechovisto.blogspot.ca/2012/03/btches-in-bookshops_19.html

Performed by La Shea Delaney (2nd verse) and @annabelleqv (1st verse)

Directed, Produced, Written by Annabelle Quezada
Shot and Edited by Eliav Mintz
Song Recorded and Mixed by Stephen Galgano

Read so hard librarians tryin’ ta FINE me­,
They can’t identify me,
Checked in with a pseudonym, so I guess you can say I’m Mark Twaining.
Read so hard, I’m not lazy.
Go on Goodreads, so much rated.
Fountainhead, on my just read, gave it four stars, and then changed it.
Read so hard, I’m literary…

It’s so true! I relate, I usually want to downgrade Goodreads ratings from 4 to lower after the fact haha!

reblogged booklit:

I GET IT
THE BOOKS ARE IN A CORNUCOPIA 
LIKE THE WEAPONS
IN THE HUNGER GAMES

Oh, I see what you did there, and I like it!

reblogged booklit:

I GET IT

THE BOOKS ARE IN A CORNUCOPIA 

LIKE THE WEAPONS

IN THE HUNGER GAMES

Oh, I see what you did there, and I like it!

Thank you to Meredith Turtis for answering my “Any words of wisdom for a wannabe writer?" survey. This advice is wonderful. It is poetic and sound.
Follow Meredith on tumblr http://blog.suchsmallhands.com/

A twenty-something, Brooklyn-based writer/magazine editor’s chronicle of her first novel, peppered with thoughts on the words and streets that make her heart race.Twitter: @meredithturits

from http://www.suchsmallhands.com/newsite/novel.php

A native New Yorker in my twenties, I’ve infused the city-centric narrative with authentic New York experiences, settings, and characters. Now, I’m hoping to bring the story to print. The project started one sweltering May evening in Brooklyn when I was twenty years old. I completed my first draft a week after my twenty-second birthday on a cruise ship floating somewhere in the Caribbean Sea, and have spent the past two years editing, reworking, workshopping, and ultimately transforming the manuscript.

Thank you to Meredith Turtis for answering my “Any words of wisdom for a wannabe writer?" survey. This advice is wonderful. It is poetic and sound.

Follow Meredith on tumblr http://blog.suchsmallhands.com/

A twenty-something, Brooklyn-based writer/magazine editor’s chronicle of her first novel, peppered with thoughts on the words and streets that make her heart race.

Twitter: @meredithturits

from http://www.suchsmallhands.com/newsite/novel.php

A native New Yorker in my twenties, I’ve infused the city-centric narrative with authentic New York experiences, settings, and characters. Now, I’m hoping to bring the story to print. The project started one sweltering May evening in Brooklyn when I was twenty years old. I completed my first draft a week after my twenty-second birthday on a cruise ship floating somewhere in the Caribbean Sea, and have spent the past two years editing, reworking, workshopping, and ultimately transforming the manuscript.

reblogged inamorataofbooks:

REBLOG SO PEOPLE WOULD START READING! :) 

Haha!

reblogged inamorataofbooks:

REBLOG SO PEOPLE WOULD START READING! :) 

Haha!

Zadie Smith, NW (The Penguin Press. September)
International award-winning and bestselling Zadie Smith’s NW brilliantly depicts the modern urban zone — familiar to city-dwellers everywhere — in a tragi-comic novel as mercurial as the city itself.

Penguin Group (USA) press release, February 27, 2012

And we have a U.S. release date for NW, folks!

(via booksmatter)

Tragi-Com!

Thank you to Adam Gnade for answering my "Any words of wisdom for a wannabe writer?" survey. This advice is especially awesome. Living life helps when we are trying to portray it! So far I have done at least one of these things, so that’s a start. Kind and honest isn’t boring, that much is true too.

Thank you to Adam Gnade for answering my "Any words of wisdom for a wannabe writer?" survey. This advice is especially awesome. Living life helps when we are trying to portray it! So far I have done at least one of these things, so that’s a start. Kind and honest isn’t boring, that much is true too.

reblogged onthestrand:

The new novel.
Hamish Hamilton, September 6th 2012.

I just died of “squeeeee”.

reblogged onthestrand:

The new novel.

Hamish Hamilton, September 6th 2012.

I just died of “squeeeee”.

reblogged rachelfershleiser:

Are you coming to AWP? Do you live in Chicago? Do you write, blog, or look at funny things on the internet? Please join us for free drinks, Tumblr goodies, and awesome people.
Tumblr Writers Happy HourFriday 3/2, 6-8pmUncharted Books2630 N. Milwaukee Ave.Chicago
Uncharted Books is a new bookstore that was funded on Kickstarter and had a Tumblr before it was born. It’s a dream spot for book-web-community nerds and I absolutely can’t wait to see it (and all of you.)

RSVP here: http://www.tumblr.com/meetup/9359
If you are or will be in the Chicago area on Friday March the 2nd, go to this meet up!
I will not be in the correct country :(

reblogged rachelfershleiser:

Are you coming to AWP? Do you live in Chicago? Do you write, blog, or look at funny things on the internet? Please join us for free drinks, Tumblr goodies, and awesome people.

Tumblr Writers Happy Hour
Friday 3/2, 6-8pm
Uncharted Books
2630 N. Milwaukee Ave.
Chicago

Uncharted Books is a new bookstore that was funded on Kickstarter and had a Tumblr before it was born. It’s a dream spot for book-web-community nerds and I absolutely can’t wait to see it (and all of you.)

RSVP here: http://www.tumblr.com/meetup/9359

If you are or will be in the Chicago area on Friday March the 2nd, go to this meet up!

I will not be in the correct country :(